Summary of the Schneide Dev Brunch at 2013-01-06

January 7, 2013

brunch64-borderedYesterday, we held another Schneide Dev Brunch. The Dev Brunch is a regular brunch on a sunday, only that all attendees want to talk about software development and various other topics. If you bring a software-related topic along with your food, everyone has something to share. The brunch had less participants this time, but didn’t lack topics. Let’s have a look at the main topics we discussed:

Sharing code between projects

The first topic emerged from our initial general chatter. What’s a reasonable and praticable approach to share code between software entities (different projects, product editions, versions, etc.). We discussed at least three different solutions that are known to us in practice:

  • Main branch with customer forks: This was the easiest approach to explain. A product has a main branch where all the new features are committed to. Everytime a customer wants his version, a new branch is created from the most current version on the main branch. The customer may require some changes and a lot of bug fixes, but all of that is done on the customer’s branch. Sometimes, a critical bug fix is merged back into the main branch, but no change from the main branch is transferred to the customer’s branch ever. Basically, the customer version of the code is “frozen” in terms of features and updates. This works well in its context because the main branch already contains the software every customer wants and no customer wants to update to a version with more features – this would be another additional branch.
  • Big blob of conditionals: This approach needs a bit more explanation. Once, there was a software product ready to be sold. Every customer had some change requests and special requirements. All these changes and special-cases were added to the original code base, using customer IDs and a whole lot of if-else statements to separate the changes from each customer. All customers always get the same code, but their unique customer ID only passes the guard clauses that are required for them. All the changes of all the other customers are deactivated at runtime. With this approach, the union of all features is always represented in the source code.
  • Project-as-an-universe: This approach defines projects as little universes without intersection. Every project stands for its own and only shares code with other projects by means of copy and paste. When a new project is started, some subset of classes of another project is chosen as a starting point and transformed to fit the requirements. There is no “master universe” or main branch for the shared classes. The same class may evolve differently (and conflicting) in different projects. This approach probably isn’t suited for a software product, but is applied to individual projects with different requirements.

We are aware of and discussed even approaches, but not with the profound knowledge of several years first-hand experience. The term OSGi was often used as a reference in the discussion. We were able to exhibit the motivation, advantages and shortcomings of each approach. It was very interesting to see that even slightly different prerequisites may lead to fundamentally different solutions.

Book (p)review: Practical API Design

In the book “Practical API Design” by Jaroslav Tunach, the founder of the NetBeans Platform and initial “architect” of its API talks about his lessons learnt when evolving a substantial API for over ten years. The book begins with a theory on values and motivations for good API design. We get a primer why APIs are needed and essential for modern software development. We learn what are the essential characteristics of a good API. The most important message here is that a good API isn’t necessarily “beautiful”. This caused a bit of discussion among us, so that the topic strayed a bit from the review characteristic. Well, that’s what the Dev Brunch is for – we aren’t a lecture session. One interesting discussion trail led us to the aestethics in music theory.
But to give a summary on the first chapters of the book: Good stuff! Jaroslav Tunach makes some statements worthy of discussion, but he definitely knows what he’s talking about. Some insights were eye-openers or at least thought-provokers for our reader. If the rest of the book holds to the quality of the first chapters, then you shouldn’t hesitate to add it to your reading queue.

Effective electronic archive

One of our participants has developed a habit to archivate most things electronically. He already blogged about his experiences:

Both blog entries hold quite a lot of useful information. We discussed some possibilities to implement different archivation strategies. Evernote was mentioned often in the discussion, diigo was named as the better delicious, Remember The Milk as a task/notification service and Google Gmail as an example to rely solely on tags. Tags were a big topic in our discussion, too. It was mentioned that Confluence has the ability to add multiple tags to an article. Thunderbird was mentioned, especially in the combination of tags and virtual folders. And a noteworthy podcast of Scott Hanselmann on the topic of “Getting Things Done” was pointed out, too.

Schneide Events 2013

We performed a short survey about different special events and workshops that may happen in 2013 in the Softwareschneiderei. If you already are registered on our Dev Brunch list, you’ll receive the invitations for all events shortly. Here is a short primer on what we’re planning:

  • Communication Through Test workshop
  • Refactoring Golf
  • API Design Fest
  • Google Gruyere Day
  • Introduction to Dwarf Fortress

Some of these events are more related to software engineering than others, but all of them try to be fun first, lessons later. Participate if you are interested!

Learning programming languages

The last main topic of the brunch was a short, rather disappointed review of the book “Seven Languages in Seven Weeks” by Bruce Tate. The best part of the book, according to our reviewer, were the interview sections with the language designers. And because he got interested in this kind of approach to a programming language, he dug up some similar content:

The Computerworld interviews are directly accessible and contain some pearls of wisdom and humour (and some slight inaccuracies). Highly recommended reading if you want to know not only about the language, but also about the context (and mindset) in which it was created.

Epilogue

As usual, the Dev Brunch contained a lot more chatter and talk than listed here. The high number of attendees makes for an unique experience every time. We are looking forward to the next Dev Brunch at the Softwareschneiderei. And as always, we are open for guests and future regulars. Just drop us a notice and we’ll invite you over next time.


Follow-up to our Dev Brunch April 2010

April 21, 2010

Last sunday, we held our Dev Brunch for April 2010. It was the start of the open air season, introducing our new office roof garden. We brunched under a clear, sunny sky (no clouds, even no vapor trails from airplanes, as they aren’t allowed to fly because of some distant volcano ash emission) and talked about agile processes and books. A major part of the brunch was graded as “informal chatter”, just as it should be like.

The Dev Brunch

If you want to know more about the meaning of the term “Dev Brunch” or how we implement it, have a look at the follow-up posting of the brunch in October 2009. We continue to allow presence over topics. Our topics for the brunch were:

  • Agile life planning – Your software development daily routine is to incrementally build software from a backlog and release it after a fixed timebox. What might happen if you transfer this process to your private life (often called “real life”)? You’ll release a week’s life every week and have a week planning meeting on sunday, filling your week/sprint backlog with the most important items of your life’s backlog. Telling from this first hand experience of about a year, it works exceptionally well, improving the leisure time quality and making “progress” visible even at harder times. The only remaining question is who acts as the product owner.
  • Converting to Scrum – First hand experience of a team that, after years of “alarm call”-style development, successfully implemented Scrum as their primary process. The effects were at least less overtime, improved progress tracking, improved code quality (though Scrum is  only a management process!) and less pressure in the project. The customer even adjusted their wording when talking about new features: “next sprint” instead of “immediately, now”. The implemented process isn’t vanilla Scrum, but works nevertheless.
  • Defending Continuous Integration – What if, after an initial phase of excitement over the new tool, the continuous integration server really reveals flaws in your project? There seems to be the tendency to kill the messenger: Shut down the CI server and everything’s fine again. This talk was about the reasoning of both sides and some basic insights gained about machine sharing. Tip of the talk: Reserve your CI server exclusively for this task.
  • Book recommendations – A random collection of technical books read in the last half year, presented with a short summary and personal rating. Titles included were Coders At Work, Founders At Work, 97 Things Every Software Architect Should Know, 97 Things Every Project Manager Should Know, 97 Things Every Programmer Should Know, Hiring the Best Knowledge Workers, Techies & Nerds and Manage Your Project Portfolio. Yes, there are some patterns visible in the book titles. And it’s a good idea to keep some checklist of read articles for most of these books.
  • Dreyfus Model of Skill Acquisition – The Dreyfus Model differentiates five to six different stages of learning some arbitrary skill. It makes assumptions how the members of the stages work, how they process feedback information and what they need to get better. See the comment section for more information and bonus material.

As usual, the topics ranged from first-hand experiences to literature research. For additional information, check out the comment sections. Comments and resources might be in german language.

Retropection of the brunch

Holding the brunch in the bright morning sun, surrounded by rooftops and birds, really is a huge gain for the ambience factor. We even found a solution to produce fresh coffee up there. This will be a fun summer for the Dev Brunch.


Booked in February

January 10, 2010

Ok, the title is a bit misleading – it’s a play of words(*). This entry is actually a book preview on the upcoming book “97 Things Every Programmer Should Know” from O’Reilly.

97 Things Of Wisdom

The “97 Things” series started out with “97 Things Every Software Architect Should Know” early last year. The book essentially is a collection of short articles on specific topics that should bother today’s software architect. You may classify as a software architect if you don’t just stir up source code but are also in charge to give the system a shape.

The articles are straight to the point and can be read within five minutes each. Don’t expect detailed textbook chapters of the topics, but they work extremely well as creative appetizers. And there are nearly a hundred appetizers from well-respected members of the software architect community in this book.

Just imagine you would meet all the authors for five minutes each on a conference and just ask them for an appealing thought. This book serves as the best replacement for it.

Wisdom continued

Soon after the first book, there was a second book in the series, “97 Things Every Project Manager Should Know”. I haven’t read this one yet, but it is on my must-read list for 2010.

And now, next month, there will be another book, this time for the fellow coder: “97 Things Every Programmer Should Know”. As usual, there are 97 selected articles with bits of wisdom from big community names. Kevlin Henney is the editor for this book (we featured him in our last blog harvest). You can take a sneak peek online in the 97TEPSK wiki, where the articles were fostered (and a second part is likely to emerge). But don’t forget to buy a paper copy that you can foist on your peers to inspire them, too.

Telling from the articles I’ve read so far, the book will be great. Please don’t expect detailed language specifics, lengthy code examples or fancy UML diagrams. But expect a whole bunch of great ideas that stem from real experiences of real programmers.

One percent of a book

What’s our relation to the new book? We’ve contributed an article to it! Even if we thereby only wrote approximately one percent of the book, it feels great and we consider ourselves honored.

The topic of our article is Extreme Feedback Devices (XFD): “Let Your Project Speak for Itself”. We gathered quite a lot of these devices over the years and ran a few experiments, so we thought we are qualified to write about it. And there it is, the first bit of our wisdom, printed in a book.

We will, of course, continue to publish our wisdom on this blog first. If you’ve followed us over the last years, the article comes as no real surprise. But I’m sure some other articles of the book will. Go buy it!

(*) Play of words in a language other than your native tongue are always dangerous. I hope this one worked out well.


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