Follow-up to our Dev Brunch November 2009

Today we held our Dev Brunch meeting for November 2009. It was the last possible date for this month, but we were affected by absences nonetheless. This is the follow-up posting for this rather small gathering, summarizing the topics and providing additional information.

The Dev Brunch

If you want to know more about the meaning of the term “Dev Brunch” or how we realize it, have a look at the follow-up posting of October’s brunch. This time, no notebook was needed.

The November 2009 Dev Brunch

The topics of this session were:

  • Object Calisthenics by example – Experiences gained while programming a small project following the Object Calisthenics rules while practicing Test Driven Development, too.
  • Object Calisthenics inspected – Observations and insights gained when explaining Object Calisthenics to several teams, programmers and student courses.

As you can immediately see, the meeting was small, but surprisingly consistent. We didn’t agree upon the topic beforehands, but it was a perfect match. Everybody who missed this brunch definitely missed some very interesting first-hand experiences on Object Calisthenics, too. To ease this lack a bit, let me rephrase the content a bit.

Object Calisthenics

You might have heard about Object Calisthenics before, on this blog or other resources on the net. Perhaps you’ve read the original article, which is highly advised. In short, Object Calisthenics are a set of inspiring, if not irritating programming rules that should lead to better programming style through excercise. You should consult the links above for specifics.

Object Calisthenics by example

When applying the rules to a domain class model, some new techniques arose to compensate the “train wreck line”-programming style (see rule 4) and to introduce first class collections (rule eight) and avoid getters and setters (rule 9). This techniques included the use of the Visitor design pattern, which wasn’t the author’s first choice beforehands. Test Driven Development alone wouldn’t have led to this solution, but the solution works well for the given use case.

The author softened some rules for his example and found valid explanations for doing so. This might be the content of an additional blog posting that still needs to be written. It will be announced in the comments when published.

Test Driven Development and Object Calisthenics do not interfere with each other. They both aim for better code and design, but through different means. They could be regarded as complements in a programmer’s toolbox.

Object Calisthenics inspected

When teaching the nine rules, some effects occurred repeatedly. The first observation was that the rules follow a dramatic composition that orders them from “most obvious and immediate code improvement” to “hardest to achieve code improvement” and in the same order from “easiest to acknowledge” to “most controversial”. At the end of the list, the audience rioted most of the time. But if you reject the last few rules, you’ve silently agreed to the first ones, the ones with the greatest potential for immediate improvement.

Another observation is that the rules stick. Even if you reject them on first notion, it creeps into your thinking, whispering that “it might be possible right now with this code“. It’s a learning catalyst for those of us that aren’t born as programming super-heros. To speak in terms Kent Beck coined: Object Calisthenics provide some handy practices that might eventually lead to a better understanding of their underlying principles. Even beginners can follow the practices and review their code on compliance. When they fully get to know the principles (like Law Of Demeter, for example), they are already halfway there.

The third observation was that most experienced programmers intuitively revealed the principles behind the rules before I could even try to explain. Some even found very interesting associations with other principles that weren’t so obvious.

At last, Object Calisthenics, if performed as a group exercise, can be a team solder. You can rant over code together without regrets – the rules were made elsewhere. And you can discuss different solutions without feeling pointless – fulfilling the rules is the common goal for a short time.

The Dev Brunch retrospected

This brunch was small both in attendee and topic count. That created a very productive discussion. We’ll try to grow the insights gained today into additional blog entries. Stay tuned.

2 thoughts on “Follow-up to our Dev Brunch November 2009

  1. Pingback: Vorlesung 2011-10-10 | DHBW KA TIT09 SE-2

  2. Pingback: Vorlesung 2012-04-04 « DHBW KA TAI10 SE2

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