Open Source Love Day July 2010

This friday , we held our Open Source Love Day for July 2010.  We began with several internal meetings and discussion (like the Homepage Comittee meeting) and dived right in our work afterwards. Everybody had a little backlog of issues that we wanted to get done on this day. Nearly everybody succeeded (well, the author had a minor delay – read about it below). The day went by in a very fast pace, but it felt right.

The Open Source Love Day

We introduced a monthly Open Source Love Day (OSLD) to show our appreciation to the Open Source software ecosystem and to donate back. We heavily rely on Open Source software for our projects. We would be honored if you find our contributions useful. Check out our first OSLD blog posting for details on the event itself.

On this OSLD, we accomplished the following tasks:

  • There are really cool new features in the latest JUnit versions and Rules are one of them. What hurt our aesthetic sense was that the field that hold the Rule instance has to be public. Checkstyle was on our side, so we tweaked JUnit to allow all kinds of visibility. You can read about the change needed here: http://github.com/KentBeck/junit/issues#issue/31. The fix is almost trivial and will hopefully be incorporated in the next versions of JUnit, so we do not publish our altered version.
  • We constantly receive requests and remarks about our cmake plugin for Hudson. This lead to a new version of the plugin fixing two issues with matrix builds and custom build types. Head over to the plugin homepage and grab the new version 1.6. The issues were in detail:
    • The plugin can be used with matrix builds now
    • Custom build types can be defined now
  • RXTX is our choice for serial port communication with Java. We fixed some issues during the last few OSLDs, with one issue left for today: When you flush your stream while using a special type of usb-to-rs232 converter, you got an exception. The corresponding issue is #102 in the RXTX issue tracker. We proposed a patch that fixes the problem.
  • Another hudson plugin is our crap4j reporter. It lacked some love for months now and finally broke when used with the latest hudson versions. Fixing the problem was a lot harder than we thought, basically because the plugin needed adjustments to recent API changes and we couldn’t figure out exactly what adjustments are necessary. You might have a look at the developer mailing list thread for this question. Finally, we got it resolved (on sunday, with a sudden stroke of insight) and a new version 0.8 is published.
  • We use an internal time tracking tool for our projects. This tool isn’t specifically open source yet, but continues to grow in terms of features and usability. The work invested in this tool helps us to continue with the OSLD, so it’s beneficial work nonetheless.
  • During the last OSLD, we had plans for a new hudson plugin and even produced a prototype. This time, we looked around the hudson plugin zoo (it’s getting a bit difficult to keep track of all of them) for inspiration and found a wonderful piece of art: The Groovy Postbuild Plugin. Using this plugin with a small groovy script served our needs exactly. No need for a full-blown plugin when you can scratch your itch with a simple script. Thanks to Serban Iordache for his great work!

What were our lessons learnt today?

  • If you need to setup a fresh workspace for an open source project, consider to prepare it over the night before, or the download delay will kill your precious work time. There is nothing more frustrating than staring at a “downloading…” progress bar while being eager to start programming.
  • Always look around what others have done before. We wanted to build a full hudson plugin from scratch when all we needed was a little groovy script placed inside another plugin. Sweet!
  • Do not hesitate to privately fix open source issues that won’t get done in time for you. Just make sure to have a management process in place to track those changes and be able to re-apply them to future versions. More important though, be able to tell exactly when NOT to re-apply them because the original project has fixed the issue.

Retrospective of the OSLD

The OSLD went smooth and was productive. We tend to work on backlogs instead of searching for random issues now, but that’s just a sign that our approach has matured and we depend on the OSLD to get work done.

Last wednesday, we held our Open Source Love Day for June 2010. This one was productive despite the heat that had us sweating the whole day long (as a sidenote: it got even warmer the days afterwards). Some features were finished and will help at least us in our projects. We still look forward for the right way to release them. Another release was even more problematic, you will read about it below.The Open Source Love Day

We introduced a monthly Open Source Love Day (OSLD) to show our appreciation to the Open Source software ecosystem and to donate back. We heavily rely on Open Source software for our projects. We would be honored if you find our contributions useful. Check out our first OSLD blog posting for details on the event itself.

On this OSLD, we accomplished the following tasks:

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