How to accidentally kill your CI build time

At one of our customers I do C++ consulting in a mid-sized project which uses cmake as build system. A clean build on our Jenkins CI server takes about 40 minutes (including unit tests) which is way too long to be considered “fast feedback” in an agile kind of way.

Because of that, we do clean builds only 2 times a day – some time during the night and during lunch break. The rest of the day the CI server only does a “svn update” and a normal “make”, which takes about 3-10 minutes depending on what files have been changed.

With C++ there are lots of ways to unnecessarily lengthen your build time. The most important factor is, of course, #include dependencies. One has to be very (very) disciplined in adding #include directives in header files. Otherwise, the whole world suddenly gets rebuild when some small header file somewhere in a little corner of the code has been changed.

And I have to say, for the most part, this project is in pretty good shape with regard to #include dependencies.

So what the hell has suddenly increased our build time from 3-10 minutes to 20-25 minutes? was what I was thinking some time last week while waiting for the CI server to spit out new latest and greatest rpm packages. For some reason, our normal, rest-of-the-day build started to compile what felt like everything in our main package even on the slightest code change in a remote .cpp file.

What happened?

In order to have the build time available (e.g. to show in an “about” box), we use a preprocessor symbol like REVISION_DATE which gets filled in a CMakeLists.txt file. The whole thing looks like this:

...
EXEC_PROGRAM(date ARGS '+%F_%T' OUTPUT_VARIABLE REVISION_DATE)
...
ADD_DEFINITIONS(-DREVISION_DATE=\"${REVISION_DATE}\")
...

Since the beginning of the time these lines of CMake code lived in a small sub-sub-..-directory with little to no incomming dependencies. Then, at some point, it became necessary to have the REVISION_DATE symbol at some other place, too, which led to a move of the above code into the CMakeLists.txt file of the main package.

The value of command date +%F_%T changes every second which leads to a changed REVISION_DATE on every build – which is what we initially intended. What changes, too, of course, is the value of the ADD_DEFINITIONS directive. And as CMake is very strict with the slightest change in this value, every make target below that line gets rebuild – which in our case was everything in the main package.

So there! Build time killing creatures are lurking everywhere in our C/C++ projects. Always be aware of them!

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