The Great Divide

Recently, I had two very contrary conversations about C++ which show very good the great divide in C++ developer community.

The first was with the technical lead of a team that writes and maintains drivers and control software for a scientific institution. These systems run 24/7 and have to be very stable and reliable.

I had discovered that they use a self-written toolbox library containing classes like SharedPtr<T>, and Thread and suspected immediately a classical NIH-syndrome. I asked him about it and why they don’t use well established libraries like boost. He told me that they indeed are only using the standard library and their own toolbox.

The reason he gave was that despite boost being most elegant C++ library out there, it required very good knowledge about the most advanced C++ mechanisms, and that his team was not on this level … I should probably mention here that his team does a very good job in running their systems. So, apparently, they get along very well with using only basic  C++ features and no “fancy” boost stuff.

The other conversation was with a friend of mine with whom I chat regularly about all sorts of programming related stuff. This time the topic was the upcoming  C++ standard and all its  exciting new stuff. He has lot’s of experience with C++ and knows the language very well. But even someone like him had a hard time to really understand what rvalue references are all about. I had not looked at them in detail, yet,  so he tried to explain them to me. During our discussion I was thinking about if teams like the one introduced before will ever use rvalue references, or other C++0X stuff in their production code, other than maybe the auto keyword for type inference, or constructor delegation.

Honestly, I don’t think stuff like  rvalue refs will become a feature that is often used by “standard industry” teams, because it adds a lot of complexity to an already complex language. Even easy-to-get stuff like the new keywords override, constexpr and final, or additional initialization means like std::initializer_list<T> will take a lot of time to get used regularly by most C++ teams.

Instead, most of C++0X will greatly increase the divide between “normal” C++ developers who get along well with using only basic language features, and experts that know every little corner of the language. And this is simply because there is so much more to know with C++0X.

But don’t let us paint this picture overly black. I, for one, am looking forward to the new standard and I will certainly spread the word about the new possibilities and features in every C++ team I work with.

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