Readability of Boolean Expressions

Following up on various previous posts on code readability and style I want to provide two more examples today – this time under the common theme of “handling of boolean values”.

Consider this (1a):

bool someMethod()
{
  if (expression) {
    return true;
  } else {
    return false;
  }
}

Yes, there are people who consider this more readable than (1b)

bool someMethod()
{
  return (expression);
}

Another example is this (2a):

  if (someExpression() == true)
    ...

versus my preferred version (2b):

  if (someExpression())
    ...

So what could be the reason for these different viewpoints? One explanation I thought of is as follows: Let’s say you have a background in C and you are therefore used to do something like:

#define FALSE (0)
#define TRUE (!FALSE)

In other words, you may not see boolean as a type of its own, like int and double, with a well-defined value range. Instead you see it more like an enumerated type which makes it feel very naturally do a expression == true comparison.

At the same time it feels not very natural to see the result of a boolean expression as being of type bool with all the consequences – e.g. to be able to return it immediately as in the first example.

Another explanation is that 1a and 2a are as verbose as it can be. You don’t have to make any mental efforts to understand what the code does.

While these may be possible explanations, my guess is that most of you, like me,  still see 1a and 2a as unnecessary visual clutter and consider 1b and 2b as far more readable.

One thought on “Readability of Boolean Expressions

  1. I normally wrap the expression I want to know with a method that has a name in form of a question

    bool hasBytesLeft(){ return countisInstantiated() ) { … }
    while( o->hasBytesLeft() ) { … }

    I find this way more readable

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s