Testing on .NET: Choosing NUnit over MSTest

We sometimes do smaller .NET projects for our clients even though we are mostly a Java/JVM shop. Our key infrastructure stays the same for all projects – regardless of the platform. That means the .NET projects get integrated into our existing continuous integration (CI) infrastructure based on Jenkins. This works suprisingly well even though you need a windows slave and the MSBuild plugin.

One point you should think about is which testing framework to use. MSTest is part of Visual Studio and provides nice integration into the IDE. Using it in conjunction with Jenkins is possible since there is a MSTest plugin for our favorite CI server. One downside is that you need either Visual Studio itself or the Windows SDK (500MB download, 300MB install) installed on the build server in addition to .NET. Another one is that it does not work with the “Express” editions of Visual Studio. Usually that is not a problem for companies but it raises the entry barrier for open source or other non-profit projects by requiring relatively expensive Visual Studio licences.

In our scenarios NUnit proved much lighter and friendlier in installation and usage. You can easily bundle it with your sources to improve self-containment of the project and lessen the burden on the system and tools. If you plug the NUnit tool into the external tools-section of Visual Studio (which also works with Express) the integration is acceptable, too.

Conclusion

If you are not completely on the full Microsoft stack for you project infrastructure using Visual Studio, TeamCity, Sourcesafe et al. it is worth considering choosing NUnit over MSTest because of its leaner size and looser coupling to the Mircosoft stack.

One thought on “Testing on .NET: Choosing NUnit over MSTest

  1. Great succinct post about why to choose NUnit. The runtime is a big killer, and I like the (more) familiar featureset and process of NUnit, though it still has it’s weak points compared to JUnit4 or TestNG.

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