The developer experience (DX): Our development process

Personally I like reading stories about how others tackle problems, their way to the solution, their process.
Recently our team sat down together to brainstorm what is not so good or even bad about our way of solving things. To address those problems and to improve our developer experience I researched and documented our typical development process. This post is intended to give you a glimpse of how we work.
First you have to know that we are a service business so usually a project starts with a (potential or recurring) customer coming to us with his concerns, his business needs. On the course of a typical project the following phases (some in iterations) run:

1. Identifying the problem (aka analysis)

Often the first expressed need is not the problem to be solved. We need to dig deeper and identify the core. At this point in the process we ask the customer goal oriented questions. We guide the conversation to find any constraints of the solution. One of these constraints is often the technological platform (web, mobile, desktop).
If it is a bigger problem we need to work through different levels of abstraction, one iteration at a time.
We document all the results in functional specs. These are small blocks of text in the language of the customer describing the functional side of the problem and its constraints. These specs form the basis of every project and are entered as issues in our JIRA.
Alongside we record the concepts of the domain in form of a glossary in our wiki.
Besides the text we draw complex or core parts of the domain as diagrams on paper. A rough domain model. A module concept. A high level architecture of the system.

2. Planning

In a planning poker session we estimate each issue from the analysis. The customer sets a priority. Together we develop a milestone plan for our iterations. Smaller (1 week) iterations for explorative or fast paced projects and longer (2 – 3 weeks) iterations for slow paced or well defined projects.

3. Finding a solution

Before implementing a solution to a problem in code, we create different concepts which fit the constraints we recorded earlier.
These concepts can be paper prototypes or sketches. Sometimes these are HTML mockups or simulations.
From these we choose the best suited concept by talking with the customer or from our experience.

4. Development

At the start of the project we set up the necessary internal infrastructure. This usually consists of a git repository and jenkins jobs for continuous integration. We install the libraries, frameworks and applications. We create a project in the IDE and start implementing. While developing we write automated tests where appropriate. We use manual testing to tell us what the users will see and how it behaves like we expected. When we think we are done we look for feedback.

5. Feedback and acceptance

For feedback we deploy the project on a staging or test system, email the customer so that he fulfills a manual user acceptance test.
If the customer accepts the solution we continue with the next phase. If bigger problems arise we reopen our JIRA issues or create new ones and start with the analysis again.

6. Delivery

First we need to set up a machine to our project specific needs: automatic or manual (snowflaking). This is called provisioning.
We create scripts and jobs in Jenkins for the following steps: one for release and one for deployment and commissioning.
The release step packages the project and creates documents from our JIRA issues which were resolved in this version. The deploy step takes the release artifact and transfers this to the target machine. Usually this step also runs the deployed project. Every installation (release and deploy/commisioning) is documented manually on paper to be traceable. An email to the customer tells him what the new release includes. Tags in the repository identify the deployed code.

7. Monitoring

Every error or exception occurring is sent via email to a project specific account. Additionally we create a job in Jenkins which supervises the system periodically. The job tries to reach the application and executes some health checks.

2 thoughts on “The developer experience (DX): Our development process

  1. Interesting. Thanks for sharing this.

    Do you normally have a period during or after the project where you reflect on the what worked or could be improved? Or is that handled by a different “process” elsewhere in your team?

    • For strategic purposes we have irregular project-independent reflection times. We only have a reflection time after a project if something gone wrong or if it was a new project. During the course of the project we only reflect about our approach if something goes (significant) wrong and restrict the reflection to the special case.

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