Domain model design with food coupons

A recent customer requirement for the implementation of an application specified that every data-modifying user action has to be confirmed by the user through a confirmation prompt.
The application in question is a single page web application with client/server communication over an HTTP JSON API. The domain model is located on the server side, the client side is the user interface.

One option to accomplish the requirement could have been to implement the confirmation process exclusively on the client-side. The client code would show a confirmation dialog right before every HTTP POST, PUT, PATCH or DELETE request and perform the request only after confirmation. This would be fairly easy to implement. The downside of this approach is that the requirement is not reflected in the application’s domain model. The requirement however is so crucial that it should be part of the domain model, not just an implementation detail of the client user interface. So we opted for a different approach, which makes the confirmation process part of the domain model and exposes it through the HTTP API.

Coupon system

The basic idea is a coupon system, analogous to the ones that can be found at some food and beverage sales booths at festivals: you choose a food or drink item, pay for it at the pay booth and get a coupon. This coupon can be redeemd at a different booth where you receive the actual item.

coupon

Source: http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Verzehrbon | License: Public domain

 

Transferred to our web application the implementation looks like this: The client sends a request for an action to the server. But instead of performing the action immediately, the server stalls the action and responds with a unique confirmation token that identifies the waiting action. The client receives the token and can finally trigger the action by sending the confirmation token to a separate confirmation API endpoint. The server recognizes the pending user action based on the confirmation token and executes it. Of course, some care has to be taken that those pending actions, which are never confirmed time out after a while and that a malicious user can’t flood the server with waiting actions. The confirmation dialog can be triggered from the client-side code via an HTTP response interceptor that checks for a confirmation token in the response and opens the confirmation dialog if a token is present and hands the token to the confirmation endpoint if the user clicks “Ok”.

Conclusion

With this design the requirement is encoded in the server-side domain model and becomes apparent through the API. Any user of the API is called to attention by the guidance of its design. Of course, an implementor of a new client could choose to ignore the hint and return the token directly to the server without prompting the user for confirmation, but that would be a deliberate and conscious choice and not a mere oversight.

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