Recap of the Schneide Dev Brunch 2015-12-13

brunch64-borderedTwo weeks ago, we held another Schneide Dev Brunch, a regular brunch on the second sunday of every other (even) month, only that all attendees want to talk about software development and various other topics. So if you bring a software-related topic along with your food, everyone has something to share. The brunch was small this time, but with enough stuff to talk about. As usual, a lot of topics and chatter were exchanged. This recapitulation tries to highlight the main topics of the brunch, but cannot reiterate everything that was spoken. If you were there, you probably find this list inconclusive:

Company strategies

Our first topic was about the changes that happen in company culture once a certain threshold is overstepped. The founders lose touch with their own groundwork and then with their own employees. Compliance frameworks are installed and then enforced, even if the rules make no sense in specific cases. A new hierarchy layer, the middle management, springs into existence and is populated by people that never worked on the topic but make all the decisions. The brightest engineers are promoted to a management position and find themselves helpless and overburdened. Adopting a new technology or tool takes forever now. The whole company stalls technologically.

Sounds familiar? We discussed several cases of this dramaturgy and some ways around it. One possible remedy is to never grow big enough. Stay small, stay fast and stay agile. That’s the Schneide way.

Code analysis with jDeodorant

We devoted a lot of time on getting to know jDeodorant, an eclipse-based code smell detection tool for Java. We grabbed a real project and analyzed it with the tool. Well, this step alone took its time, because the plugin cannot be operated in an intuitive manner. It presents itself as a collection of student thesis work without overarching narrative and a clear disregard of expectation conformity. If several experienced eclipse users cannot figure out how a tool works despite having used similar tools for years, something is afoul. We got past the bad user experience by viewing several screencasts, the most noteworthy being a plain feature demonstration.

Once you figure out the handling, the tool helps you to find code smells or refactoring opportunities. In our case, most of the findings were false alarms or overly picky. But in two cases, the tool provided a clear hint on how to make the code better (both being feature envies). If the project would really benefit from the proposed refactorings is subject for discussion. The tool acts like a very assiduous colleague in a code review when every improvement gets rewarded.

We really don’t know how to rate this tool. It’s hard to learn and provides little value on first sight, but might be useful on larger legacy code bases. We’ll keep it at the back of our minds.

Naming and syntax rules

During the discussion about jDeodorant, we talked about naming schemes and other syntax rules. We remembered horrific conventions like prefixed I and E or suffixed Exception. The last one got some curious looks, because it’s still a convention in the Java SDK and some names won’t make it without, like the beloved IOException. But what about the NullPointerException? Wouldn’t NullPointer describe the problem just as good? Kevlin Henney already talked about this and other ineffective coding habits (if you have audio degradation halfway through, try another video of the talk). It’s a good eye-opener to (some of) the habits we’ve adopted without questioning them. But challenging the status quo is a good thing if done in reasonable doses and with a constructive attitude.

Unit testing

When we played around with jDeodorant and surfed the code of the project that served as our testing ground, the Infinitest widget raised some questions. So we talked about Continuous Testing, unit tests and some pitfalls if your tests aren’t blazing fast. The eclipse plugin for MoreUnit was mentioned soon. Those two plugins really make a difference in working with tests. Especially the unannounced shortcut Ctrl+J is very helpful. I’ve even blogged about the topic back in 2011.

Epilogue

As usual, the Dev Brunch contained a lot more chatter and talk than listed here. The number of attendees makes for an unique experience every time. We are looking forward to the next Dev Brunch at the Softwareschneiderei. And as always, we are open for guests and future regulars. Just drop us a notice and we’ll invite you over next time.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s