Recap of the Schneide Dev Brunch 2017-04-09

brunch64-borderedLast sunday, we held another Schneide Dev Brunch, a regular brunch on the second sunday of every other (even) month, only that all attendees want to talk about software development and various other topics. This brunch was well-attended and opened the sunroof season for us. We even had to take turns on the sunny places because we didn’t want to catch a sunburn in April. As usual, the main theme was that if you bring a software-related topic along with your food, everyone has something to share. Because we were very invested in our topics, we established an agenda for the event. As usual, a lot of topics and chatter were exchanged. This recapitulation tries to highlight the main topics of the brunch, but cannot reiterate everything that was spoken. If you were there, you probably find this list inconclusive:

Online courses

Our first topic was an report on an ongoing online course, a so-called MOOC (Massive Open Online Course) on the topic “Software Design for Non-Designers”. It aims at bringing basic knowledge of UX and UI design to programmers, who frequently lack even the most fundamental principles of design (other than code design and even that is open for discussion). A great advantage of these MOOCs is that you can minimize your brutto time investment and therefor maximize your netto yield. You are not bound to a certain place, free from specific times (other than the interaction with other participants) and yet free to engage in a community of peers. The question that remains is how valueable the certificate will be. But the initial expectations are met: The specific course is very practical and requires moderate effort in reasonable periods.

One crucial aspect is the professionality of the presenting lecturer. In this MOOC, there are talk-oriented presenters and then there is Scott Klemmer. His lectures stand out because he writes on an invisible wall before him. The camera looks through the wall. What seems like nice CGI turns out to be a real glass pane. Mr. Klemmer puts down his note in mirror writing! Once you realize that, you cannot help it but be in awe.

There are a lot of MOOCs nowadays. Other courses that got mentioned cover the topic of machine learning https://www.coursera.org/learn/machine-learning and Getting Started with Redux (a famous Javascript framework) by Dan Abramov on Egghead: https://egghead.io/courses/getting-started-with-redux. Some courses even take place on Youtube, if you manage to avoid the comment sections, like the talks from Geoffrey Hinton about neuronal networks and machine learning. Mr. Hinton is part of the Google Brain team.

The critical part of each MOOC is the final examination. Some courses require online or even real-time tests, some online provide certificates for test results in a certain timespan. Usually, the training assignments are peer reviewed by other course participants.

We will probably see this type of knowledge transfer more often in the future.

Interesting websites

While we talked about a lot of topics at once, some websites and projects got mentioned. I include them here without full coverage of the topics that led to it:

  • jsfiddle: A website that provides a quick sketchboard for web technologies like Javascript, HTML and CSS. It’s like a repl for the web.
  • regex101: A website that provides a quick sketchboard (and debugger) for regular expressions in different languages. It’s like an online IDE for regular expressions.
  • codefights: A website that puts you in the fighting pit for developers. Prove your programming skills against competition all around the globe!
  • vimgolf: A website that lets you prove your proficiency in the only text editor that counts: vim. Every keystroke counts and a mouse cannot be found!

Some of these websites might be a lot more fun in a team, except the regex one. Don’t use regular expressions in a team project! It’s a violation of the sane developer’s rules of engagement.

Workplace conflicts

One participant reported about his latest insights in conflict management during work. He applied the concepts of warfare and the four steps of complex tasks to recent disputes and had tremenduous results. Even the introduction chapter of the Strategies of War book was enough to install new notions and terms into his planning and acting. He was astounded by the positive effects of his new portfolio.

The new terminology seems to be the essential part. European (or even western) adults don’t learn the terminology of conflict and therefore cannot process disputes on a rational level, only with emotions. You cannot plan or communicate with emotions, so you cannot plan your conflict behaviour. As soon as you have the language to describe the things you perceive, you can analyze them, reflect on them and plan for them. Making a solid plan (other than “go in and win somehow”) is the best preparation for an upcoming conflict. Words shape our world. I’ve seldomly seen it clearer than in this report.

Just for starters, there is a difference between a “friend” and an “ally”.

Project documentation

An open question to all participants was our handling of documentation efforts in a project, be it for the user, customer or following developer. We discussed it with this open scope and came up with some tools that I can repeat here:

  • The arc42 software architecture template can help to shape the documentation effort for future developers or current developers if they aren’t included in the architecture effort.
  • The user manual is often written in TEX. Developers are used to the tool by constant exposition during their academic studies.
  • One idea was to generate the requirements for the developers from the user manual, as in “user manual first” or “user manual driven development”.
  • The good old Markdown syntax is useable but has its limits in top-notch aesthetics.
  • We see some potential in ASCIIDoc, but it needs to improve further to play in the same league as other tools.
  • Several participants have tried to automate the process of taking screenshots of the software for usage in various documents. If you want to try this, be warned! There are many detail problems that need to be solved before your solution will be fully automatic and reliable. A good starting point for thoughts is the “handbook data set” that can reproduce the same screenshot content (like entries in lists, etc.) in a different software version.

In the outskirt area of this discussion, the worthwhile talk “Stop Refactoring!” by Nat Pryce was mentioned. He presents an interesting take on the old question of “good enough”.

Epilogue

As usual, the Dev Brunch contained a lot more chatter and talk than listed here. The number of attendees makes for an unique experience every time. We are looking forward to the next Dev Brunch at the Softwareschneiderei in June. We even have some topics already on the agenda (like a report about first-hand experiences with the programming language Rust). And as always, we are open for guests and future regulars. Just drop us a notice and we’ll invite you over next time.

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