The project jugglers

By Usien (Own work) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia CommonsIn this blog post, I will shine some light on a feature of our company that is often met with disbelief: How five developers can work on twenty projects at once without being stressed. I try to use the metaphor of a juggler, though I know nothing about juggling other than it can be done. I cannot hold more than one object in the air at any given time and even that is an optimistic estimate. But I’ve seen jugglers keep six to eight objects flying with seemingly no effort. We do this with software development projects.

A layman theory of juggling

A good metaphor can be applied from start to finish. I’ve probably chosen a bad metaphor, but it gives the right initial impression: Every developer at our company leads several projects at once. He (or she) keeps the projects alive and in the “green zone”, the ratio of remaining budget, time and scope (read: work left to be done) that promises little to no trouble in the foreseeable future.

In order to juggle without visible effort, you probably need to practice a lot. You probably drop your objects a lot. You probably need to watch the objects fly in the beginning.

In our case, we needed a lot of practice to reach our level of confidence. We lead development projects for up to 17 years now. Each developer finishes between four and seven projects per year. That’s up to a hundred projects to gain experience from. But we couldn’t drop (read: fail) a lot of projects, because it directly hurt our bottom line. Just imagine you want to learn how to juggle, but all you got are expensive ming vases that you bought from your own money, without insurance. That’s how it feels to “experiment” with projects. So we play it safe and only accept projects we know we can handle. And we watch our projects fly, very very closely. In fact, we have a dedicated position, the “project manager”, with the one duty to periodically ask a bunch of questions to assure that the project is still in the green zone.

Draw the trajectory

Every object that you can juggle has its own characteristics of how it behaves once it is in the air. A good juggler can feel its trajectory and grab it in just the right moment before it would fall out of reach. The trick to keep a software development project in the green zone is the same: Get a hold on it before it ventures too far in an unfortunate direction, which is the natural tendency of all projects. The project lead has to periodically apply effort to keep the project afloat. But when is the right time to invest this effort? Spend it too soon and it has only minimal effect. Spend it too often and you’ll exhaust your power and your budget. But because every project has its own trajectory, too, and you can’t afford to let it slip, you should make the trajectory as visible as possible. You should draw it!

We’ve experimented with a lot of tools and visualizations. The one setup that works best for us is a low technology, high visibility approach. The project lead takes one half of a whiteboard and draws a classic burn-down chart or a variation (we often use a simple vertical progress bar). This chart is hand-drawn and rather crude, but big enough that everybody can see it. It is updated at least every time the project manager comes around to ask his or her questions. One of the questions actually is: “Is this chart up to date?”. The remaining budget of your project needs to be available at a glance, from across the hall. The project lead needs to “feel” this budget. And if it makes him or her nervous, it’s high time to determine the remaining scope and calendar time of the project once again.

In doing this positioning by triangulation on a regular schedule, the project lead draws the trajectory of the project for all three axes and can probably interpolate its future course. He can then apply effort to nudge (or yank, if things got worse fast) the project back on track.

Without the visibly drawn trajectory, your project lead is like a juggler in the dark, tossing unknown objects in the air and hoping that they’ll fall in place somehow.

Know your limit

As the complete noob to juggling that I am, I imagine that jugglers have a secret dress code like martial artists (watch their belts!), where other jugglers can read how many objects they can hold up at once. Something like buttons on the vest or the length of a scarf. So the beginning 3-objects juggler bows in awe to the master 12-juggler, who himself is star-struck by the mighty 18-juggler that happens to attend the same meet-up.

In our company, this “dress code” would be based on the number of projects you are leading. And just like with the jugglers, it is important that you know your current limit. There is no use in over-extending yourself, if you accidentally let one project slip, the impact is big enough that you’ll fail your other projects, too. Just like the juggler loses his or her rhythm, you’ll lose your “flow”.

The most important part of juggling many projects is that you always juggle one less than you are capable of. You need reaction time if one of them topples over. A good juggler can “rescue” the situation with subtle speedup or extra movements because the delay between necessary actions allows for it. A good project lead has emergency reserves to spend without compromising other projects.

There is nothing wrong to start with two projects and add more later on when you are more confident. But don’t start with only one. You can only form habits of resource sharing if you share from the beginning. Even I can pose as a competent 1-juggler, but the lowest bar to juggling has to be two objects.

Box your time

Again, I know nothing about juggling. But from a mathematical viewpoint, juggling is “just” an exercise in timeboxing. If you have four objects in the air, in an arc that requires one second to go around, you’ll be able to spend a quarter second (250 ms) of attention to each object on each rotation. The master 12-juggler from above can only afford 1/12th or 80 milliseconds for each object. If he takes longer for one object, the next one will suffer. If he has no time reserves, a jam will build up and ultimately break the routine.

So, as a project lead, you need to apply timeboxes on all of your projects. They don’t need to be of equal size, but small enough that you can multiplex between your projects fast and often enough. A time box is a fixed-size amount of time that you allot to a specific task. The juggler uses a time box to put the next falling object flying back up. In our lunch break, we allot 60 minutes to food, beverages and some amount of walking. And if the process of eating takes longer than usual (I’m a chronic slow-eater, I can’t help it)? Then I have to go back partially hungry because I’ll end my lunch break on time. That’s the most important characteristic of a time box: You either succeed “in time” or interrupt or even cancel the task. The juggler will drop the one iffy object instead of risking a complete breakdown of the arc. You need to let your problematic task go (for the moment) instead of spreading the problem onto your other projects, too.

We’ve found that the amount of “one workday” is the most natural and easiest to manage time box. So we try our best to partition our week in the granularity of days and not our days in the granularity of hours. One aspect that helps tremendously is to have different physical locations for different projects. So you can be physically present “in the project” or “too far away at the moment” from the project. You plan your work week in locations as much as you plan it in project time boxes. The correlation of workdays, locations and projects is so strong that it doesn’t even seem to be timeboxing or project multiplexing. You just happen to be in the right place to work on project X for today. This is how you can juggle up to five projects without having to compromise all that much (provided you have a five-day work week).

If you can’t physically relocate your work, at least try to have a fixed schedule for your projects, like the “project A monday” or the “project X friday”. This might also mean to postpone emerging issues with project X until next friday. You need to build up skills to negotiate these delays with your customers. If your customers can dictate your schedule, you’ll get torn to shreds in no time. It’s friday or no day for issues on project X – at least as a good start for heavy bargaining. But that’s a whole topic for another blog post. Please leave a comment if you are interested to hear more about it.

Stuff your box

The “one workday” time box has a strong implication: Every little thing you do for a project takes one day. That doesn’t mean you should work for five minutes on project A, completing the task, and then stare into the air and twiddle your thumbs. It means that you should accumulate enough tasks for project A that you can spend the better half of the day on the known tasks and the remaining time on the unknown problems that arise on the way. In the evening, you should be able to finish your work for project A with a feeling of closure. You can put project A aside until next week (or whenever your next cycle is). You can concentrate on project B tomorrow and project C the next day. Both projects didn’t bother you today (well, perhaps a bit, but you only acknowledged some e-mails and deferred any real thoughts on it until you enter their timebox).

Perpetual closure

The feeling of closure at the end of a successful work day is the most important thing that keeps you composed. You’ve done your thinking for project A this week and will think of project B tomorrow. But now, you can rest.

This must be the feeling that the juggler experiences with each object that goes up again. It is out of sight and only needs attention after it has nearly completed its arc again. And now for the next object, one at a time…

 

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Eliminate the Water Carrier

Some years ago, an old lady with more than hundred years of life experience im America was asked which technology changed her life the most. She didn’t hesitate to answer: running water. The ability to open the tap and have instant access to fresh water was the single most important technology in her life, even before electricity and all the household appliances it enables. Without running water, every household is forced to employ or pay a worker that does nothing else but to carry water from the source to the sink.

In today’s physical world, with physical goods, there is still a profession that relies on a specific aspect of physical objects: They won’t move from A to B without a carrier. The whole field of logistics and transportation would be obsolete in the instant that physical goods learn to move themselves. The water carrier lives on, in the form of a cardboard or palette carrier.

The three basic goods of IT are software, data and information. They all share a common trait: They can move without a human carrier. In the old days before the internet, software was distributed on physical objects like floppy disks (think of oddly shaped usb sticks) or CDs later. With the ubiquitous access to running data (often called the internet and mobile computing), we can draw our software straight from the tap. (And yes, I like the metaphor of the modem as an “information tap”). As the data throughput of our internet connections grew, it became feasible to move large amounts of data into “the cloud”. The paper boy that brings the newspaper early every morning is replaced by a virtual newspaper that updates every few seconds. The profession of a data carrier didn’t exist outside of very delicate data movements. And even them got replaced by strong cryptography.

Even information and knowledge, a classic carrier-bound good, is slowly replaced by books and pre-recorded online courses. The “wise man” (or woman) still exists, but his range was extended from his immediate geographical surrounding and his arbirtrary placement on the timeline to the whole world and all times after his publication. We don’t need to be physically present to attend a course anymore and we don’t need to synchronize our schedule with the lecturer. Knowledge and information is free to roam the planet.

With all this said and known, why are there still jobs and activities that resemble nothing more than the water carrier of our information age? Let me reiterate once more what a water carrier does: He takes something from position A and moves it to position B. In the ideal case, everything he picked up at A is delivered at B, in full and unchanged. We don’t want the carrier to lose part of the water underway and we surely don’t want him to tamper with our water.

As soon as you add something valueable to the payload (you augment it) while you carry it from A to B, you aren’t a water carrier anymore, you can be described in terms of your augmentation. But what if you add nothing? If you deliver the payload in the same condition as you picked it up? Then you are a water carrier. You don’t have a justification for your work in IT. Or you have one that I can’t see right now, then I’m eager to hear from you! Please leave a comment.

There is a classic movie that describes life and work in IT perfectly: Office Space. If you haven’t seen it yet, please put it on your watch list. I’m sure you can even draw it from your information tap. In the movie, a company with a generic IT name needs to “consolidate their staff” (as in lose some slackers). They hire some consultants that interview the whole crew. Each interview is hilarious in itself, but one is funny, tragic and suitable for our topic at hand, the water carrier:

The problem with Tom Smykowski (the guy trying to defend his job) is, that he’s probably better with people than most developers, but he still cannot sell his augmentations to the two consultants. They try to tie him down to a physical good that must be carried, but even Tom has to admit that somebody else covers the physical level. So he tries to sell his “good influence” on the process as the augmentation, but the consultants are too ignorant to recognize it. Needless to say, Tom loses his job.

Every time you just relay information without transforming it (like appending additional information or condensing it to its essence), you just carry water. Improve your environment by bypassing yourself. If you take yourself out of the communication queue, you will save time and effort and nobody has a disadvantage. You should only be part of a communication or work queue if you can augment the thing being passed through the queue. If you can’t specify your augmentation, perhaps somebody else behind you in the queue can give you hints about it. I would argue that being able to pinpoint one’s contribution to the result is the most important part of every workplace description. If you know your contribution, you can improve it. Otherwise, you may be carrying water without even knowing it.

Eliminate the middlemen in your work queues to improve efficiency. But be sure to keep anybody who contributes to the result. So, eliminate the water carriers.

The Four Steps of Complex Tasks (Part II)

In the first part of this blog entry, we talked about how complex tasks need to be addressed with a proper problem-solving framework. One such mental framework can be found in traditional warfare. It involves all the anticipated artifacts like headquarters, mission statements and a general’s map, but will likely omit the gruesome parts of actual battle.

We started with the mission statement and then began to make a plan with four steps:

  • Reconnaissance
  • Maneuver
  • Offensive
  • Defensive

Step one: Reconnaissance

In the first step, we tried to unveil every part of the scenario and draw a complete map of the terrain. A botched reconnaissance is probably the root cause of most failed missions. You can read all the details about the reconnaissance step in the first part of this blog entry.

Step two: Maneuver

Emergency preparation equipment on the grass, on the nature backgroundFor a real army, maneuvering means to “change position”. In preparation of a battle, it means to secure the positions that will maximize the own effect and/or minimize the effect of the opponent. Most battles are already decided in this phase, with the following fighting being more or less the playback of the drama the generals anticipated. The ultimate victory in military warfare is the victory by maneuver, when the opponent revises his position before the battle and concedes that he lost already.

In our example case, we wage war on the call for proposals for a big software project. It would be our ultimate victory if we could convince the project owner that no call for proposals is even necessary because we are clearly the best-fitting proposer. But that would have required actions from our side in the past and that chance has passed. We need to prepare for the “fight” under the rules of the project owner, we need to submit a better proposal than everybody else.

Our maneuver step contains every preparative action we need to do so we can play out the last two steps in a smooth fashion. If we need to create an account to submit our proposal, then now is the time to create it. If we need to buy some office supplies to print the proposal in top-notch quality, we should buy them now. Just like a real army stocks their supplies near the anticipated battlefield, we need to stock our supplies, physical like the office supplies or virtual like the user account or a signing certificate.

The goal of maneuvering is to never stall when the last two steps are due. We take our knowledge from the reconnaissance step and interpolate it into the future. The maneuver actions support our scenario of the future. Once the third step is in progress, every negligence in maneuvering will mean delay, makeshift solutions and partial failure. If the negligence is too widespread, it will result in overall failure.

Step three: Offensive

Hiker crossing rocky terrain in the Bryce Canyon National Park, USAIn a real battle, once the maneuvering is done, things “get real”. This usually means that shots are fired. In our example, we also fire shots, but imaginative ones. During the offensive, we really work on the meat of the proposal. We dig into the details of the project and produce estimates and concepts. We use the mandated structure for the proposal to fill our proposition in. We concentrate on fabricating content.

In this phase, things get messy and confusing very fast. There are just way too many details needing attention all at once. This is where our plan from the reconnaissance step comes to our rescue. We need to make sure that we don’t stray from the plan too much. Remember, our “opponent” isn’t moving, it’s a static target. So our plan will stay mostly valid during the offensive. If not, this indicates flaws in previous steps and should be taken seriously. If you can afford it, time- or effortwise, rewind your mission back to step one if you find yourself attacking dummy problems or empty terrain that leads you nowhere. A well-planned offensive has immediate and visible effects.

Your work during the offensive phase might look chaotic and erratic from the outside, but it should be cold-blooded and calculated in your experience. This phase is known to intimidate you with overwhelming feelings of anxiety and despair. Stick to your plan and don’t panic! If you’ve planned it well, it will go well. If you didn’t trust your plans beforehands, why would you even proceed to this step? There is no damage done when your reconaissance unveils a task to heavy for your taste and you make an immediate retreat. There is little loss in surrendering your efforts to an opponent that played the maneuvering game better than you, like requiring several comparable projects as reference for the proposal, but you are a newcomer on the market. It will ache, but you cut your losses and move on. But starting an all-out offensive that you are not sure you’ll win? That’s just stupid or desperate.

Two remarks here: First, Being sure you’ll win means you are sure to fulfill your mission, in our example to submit a valid proposal. That doesn’t imply you need to be sure to win the pitch itself. Stick to your mission statement and win the battle before you try to win the whole war. Second, if you hold back on your offensive, you set yourself up for failure because of indecision and foot-dragging. Every offensive should be all-out or not started at all. You are in this game to win, not to play.

Step four: Defensive

Let’s assume our offensive was successful. In a real battle, we have conquered the enemy’s stronghold or additional terrain. The enemy is defeated. A movie would now show the end credits, a computer game the game results. But this is real life, there is no “end point”. Your troops are all over the place, probably in a sorry shape and without a clear goal to look forward to. If your enemy has any troops left, now is the best moment to run you over. Your victory would be pyrrhic, your winning would finally cause your defeat.

The clever strategist has already planned the defense after the offensive (and victory). Often, this means a partial retreat after the battle in order to “straighten the lines”. We can’t do that in our example, it would mean we take back promises after our proposal wins the pitch. But we can plan our defense after victory.

Let’s assume our proposal wins. What does that mean for our company? Who will work on the project? Can we keep our promises even if external circumstances like other projects, other proposals or our staff changes? What will we gain from the project? What concessions can we make to the customer if he wants to re-negociate? Do we need to re-negociate as soon as the agreement is made? The last question answered with yes is a typical sign of over-commitment in the offensive phase and tells about poor leadership.

In our example, let’s say we’ve promised the customer a 24/7 support hotline for the software. We need to make sure how to fulfill this promise before we send out our proposal. There is no value in making hollow promises that we cannot keep. This would be like losing captured terrain again just because you cannot provide enough troops to secure it. It’s not worth the effort and an all-around damper on morale. Just to be clear here: You don’t need to act on the fullfilling of the promises before you’ve won, but you cannot wait with the planning. So we need to have a clear plan on how to implement a 24/7 support hotline, but we only need to act on it as soon as we are sure it is really necessary. We need to take steps one and two for the support hotline mission, but hold back the later steps until our proposal has won and the contracts are signed.

Don’t omit this step in your planning. A successful offensive without the backing of a good defensive is the prelude to a disaster.

Conclusion

We’ve learnt the four steps to master each complex task, lent from the art of warfare, namely reconaissance, maneuver, offensive and defensive, that form a pattern you can repeat each time with the same structure, but always different content. Every task will require a different solution, but the solution’s framework is always the same. This framework can be applied to tasks that seem to have nothing in common with warfare, but still play by the same rules. This is a powerful tool because it opens centuries of knowledge in military warfare to your creative transfer approach. And it is an effective tool because you don’t need to study history to apply it to your cause. Just reiterate the four steps and conquer your task.

If you’ve already applied these four steps, perhaps without consciously realizing it, I would love to hear your story and the outcome. Please leave your comment below!

The Four Steps of Complex Tasks (Part I)

In software development, we often face complex tasks that need to be addressed with nearly certain success rates. “Failure is not an option” is an easy sentence to say, but hard to implement. As experienced software developers, we’ve learnt our share from failures or near-misses and have probably derived an implicit problem-solving framework for our typical tasks. But what if the tasks are not so typical? What if we need to do complex work where we lack experience – and know it?

Adopting a problem-solving framework

In order to keep this blog entry as practical as possible, lets tell the theory with the help of an example that will be foreign to most software developers: You need to participate in a call for proposals for a big software project. You are responsible for the complete process from downloading and reading all documents for the call for proposals, making sense of the requirements, making a plan and an estimate, writing everything up and delivering your proposal in time and form at the right address. You cannot rely on the help of more experienced colleagues. You will probably feel overwhelmed and a bit helpless.

Now is the time to look for proven problem-solving frameworks that will at least help you coordinate your work and remind you about necessary steps that might go by the board otherwise. There are probably numerous frameworks out there, but I’ve found one to be easily applicable and reliable in the outcome. It’s the four steps of warfare. “Warfare” is a heavy word that isn’t in the dictionary of most people. It really means “to wage war” on somebody or something. But it doesn’t imply death, injury or even a “loser”. If you can wrap your head around the following sentence, we can easily forget its ancestry and follow the steps without any bloodshed: We are about to wage war on the call for proposals.

Being on a mission

We are now on a mission! Every mission starts with the most important piece of information: The mission statement. In this statement, the primary goals of the mission need to be declared as clear and unambiguous as possible. In our example, the mission statement might read like “I want to deliver a complete, believable and feasible proposal for the software project while adhering to all formalities”. It is worthwhile to write the mission statement down and keep it visible. This is your goal, this is why you wage war. Anything you do during the mission that doesn’t help you further your case in regard to the mission statement can be called a distraction (or in agile speak: “waste”).

Analyzing our example’s mission statement, we can conclude that we have two fields of work to cover: the content of the proposal and the formalities of the call. Both need to be covered successfully in order to achieve mission success. It is not enough to have a formidable proposal but send it in too late or without certain required characteristics. And it doesn’t do good to send something awful in that fulfills all technical requirements of the proposal but stands no chance because of its content. You’ve just discovered that your war will be fought on two fronts (content and formalities) and neglecting either one of them will not result in victory. That is an important discovery for the moment you employ your “troops” – time, attention, effort and material in our case.

The four steps

But slow down! We are far away from employing our troops! We first need to learn about the four steps of warfare. With our mission statement at hand, we have to make a plan for these steps:

  • Reconnaissance
  • Maneuver
  • Offensive
  • Defensive

Nearly every military mission can be broken down into these four steps in that order. We cover the first step in this blog post and the following three in the second part next week:

Step one: Reconnaissance

hunter looking through binocularsEvery warfare mission has important things at stake. There would be no mission otherwise, because each mission is expensive. With something big at stake, you want to reduce risk as much as possible. The military way to reduce risk is to gather knowledge about the enemy, to “increase intelligence”. Our “enemy” is the call for proposals with its deadline and rules and requirements. It is an easy enemy in a way, because all information is already made available in clear form and will not change over time. Or is it? Our first move should be to gather and revise all documents that tell us something about the call for proposals. Are we in possession of all available information? Nothing will break our neck more effectively than forgetting to read all documents. The sentence “I didn’t know that!” might sound like a good explanation why the mission failed, but it only indicates that you already failed in the reconnaissance step. Everything you do after a botched reconnaissance has a high risk of being ineffective, useless or downright counter-productive. You need to be sure to survey the complete terrain (read all the documents). A general that says “we don’t need to look behind this mountain, there will be nothing behind it” is in danger of failure as sure as you are if you say “that’s probably all information there is, what else should one want from me?”. Don’t underestimate your enemy! Just because you can download and read everything in regard to your call of proposals doesn’t mean it can be found at one place or will be conveniently available. Double-check that you’ve followed each hint about additional rules (like in general terms and conditions). Read all documents carefully!

When you’ve gathered a complete map of the terrain (have all rules and requirements in readable form), it’s time to mark the problematic features. Make a list of all formalities you need to adhere to. This list is already part of your battle plan. You will later need to employ resources to check off each point of this list. Mark all requirements that you find problematic or surprising. Those are like the strongholds on a battlefield. They need extra attention from you later on. Take your list of simple tasks and tack it on your mission board. If you didn’t have one yet, you’ll have it now. The mission board will look exactly like in the movies when you complete your first step. On top goes the mission statement, with your task list in whatever fashion suits you beneath it (some prefer the ordered list, some might draw a graph, whatever works for you). The mission board is for you and you only, nobody else needs to understand it. You’ve just created your headquarter! Now you have all ingredients to assemble your troops on the battlefield: you know the terrain, where the enemy resides, where you are and what your mission is.

Now is the time to get moving – in part two of this blog entry series next week. Stay tuned!

A simple yet useful project metric

In my years of managing software development projects, I’ve come to apply a simple metric to each project to determine its “personality”. The metric consists of only two aspects (or dimensions): success and noise. Each project strives to be successful in its own terms and each project produces a certain amount of “noise” while doing so. Noise, in my definition, is necessary communication above the minimum. A perfectly silent project isn’t really silent, there are just no communicated problems. That doesn’t mean there aren’t any problems! A project team can silently overcome numerous problems on their own and still be successful. The same team can cry for help at each and any hurdle and still fail in the long run. That would mean a lot of noise without effect. I call such a project a “Burning Ox”.

Success vs. Noise

metric

As you can see, there are four types of projects with this metric. The desired type of project is the “White Knight” in the top-left quarter, while the “Burning Ox” in the bottom-right is the exact opposite. Let’s review all four types:

  • White Knight (silently on track): A project that is on track, tackles every upcoming challenge on its own, reports its status but omits the details and turns out to be a success is the dream of every project manager. You can let the team find its own way, document their progression and work on the long-term goals for the team and the product. It’s like sailing in quiet waters on a sunny day. Nothing to worry about and a pleasant experience all around.
  • Drama Queen (loud, but on track): This project is ultimately headed towards success, but every obstacle along the way results in emergency meetings, telephone conferences or e-mail exchanges. The number of challenges alone indicate that the team isn’t up to the task. You are tempted to micro-manage the project, to intervene to solve the problems and ensure success or at least progress. But you are bound to recognize some or even most problems as non-existent. The key sentence to say or think is: “Strange, nobody else ever had this problem and we’ve done it a dozen times before”. If you are a manager for several projects, the Drama Queens in your portfolio will require the majority of your time and attention. You’ll be glad when the project is over and “peaceful” times lie ahead.
  • Backstabber (silent and a failure): This is the biggest fear of every manager. The project seems alright, the team doesn’t report any problems and everything looks good. But when the cards need to be put on the table, you end up with a weak combination. It’s too late to do anything about the situation, the project is a failure. And it failed because you as the manager didn’t dig deeper, because you let them fool you. No! If you look closer, it failed because nobody dug deeper and everybody was in denial. You’ll see the warning signs in retrospective. You will become more paranoid in your next project. You’ll lose faith in the project status reports of your teams. You’ll inquire more and micro-manage the communication. You’ll become a skittish manager because of this unpleasant experience. Backstabber projects have horrendous costs for the social structure of a company.
  • Burning Ox (loud and failing): The name stems from an ancient war tactics when the enemy’s camp was overrun by a horde of oxen with burning torches bound to the horns. The panicked animals wreaked havoc along their way and started fires left and right. A Burning Ox is helpless in the situation, but takes it out on anybody and anything near it, too. This project is bound to fail, the team is in it way over their heads and no amount of support from your side or help from the outside can safe it. Well, experienced firefighters might work wonders, but they are expensive and rare (we know because we are often called in for this job). If you find a Burning Ox in your project portfolio (and you will know it, because a Burning Ox screams on the top of his lungs), prepare yourself for the inevitable: The project will fail, in scope (missing functionality), budget (higher costs) and/or time (delayed delivery). You better start with damage control now or make a call to a firefighter you can trust.

Easy assessment

This project management metric is not meant for deep inspection, but for easy assessment and quick communication. You can convey your desired communication style and the fact that everybody involved with the project is partly responsible for its success or failure. The metric states that too much detail is not helpful and too little detail can be disastrous. It also shows that loudly failing projects are not the fault of the project team alone (the ox cannot help being used as a living torch), but that the prerequisites of the project weren’t met.

Takeaway

If you are not a project manager, what can you learn from this blog post? Ask yourself if you require too much help from your manager, forcing him/her to switch into the micro-management gear, even if you could solve the problem yourself. If you cannot, ask yourself if you think that you can deliver the project in scope, time and budget or if you already smell the fire. If you can smell the fire, is your manager aware? Are you telling him/her in unclouded words about your perceived state of the project? Did you attempt to communicate your perception/feeling at least twice? If not, your manager might be shocked that he/she took care of a Backstabber project. A failing project is not your fault! You would only be to blame for the continued hiding of a known fact.

If you are a project manager, take a piece of paper, draw the metric’s chart and try to pin-point the position of all your projects. Be as honest and exact as possible. Is it really a Burning Ox or “just” a Drama Queen? Are your White Knights really above reproach or is their loyality questionable? What questions could you ask to try to unveil hidden problems, even those that nobody is aware of yet?

These quick, repeated assessments help me to manage my schedule and not forget about the silent projects because the loud projects always ellbow their way into my attention.

Children behind the wheel

A few weeks ago, I read a funny news article about a 11 years old boy who stole a bus and drove the normal route with it. When the police stopped him, he had already picked up some passengers and somehow managed to only inflict minor damages along the way. The whole story (in german) can be read here.

Author: Vitaly Volkov, Волков Виталий Сергеевич (user kneiphof) https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:KneiphofThis blog entry is not about the unheeding passengers, it’s about the little boy and his mindset. This mindset exists in the business world, too. It’s the mixture of “what could possibly go wrong?” with “I’m totally able to pull this off” and a large dose of “everybody else is surely faking it, too”. In the context of the Dunning-Kruger effect, this mixture is called “unskilled and unaware of it”. It’s a dangerous situation for both the employee and the employer, because neither of them can properly evaluate the actual risk.

The Dunning-Kruger effect

Let’s start with the known theory. The Dunning-Kruger effect describes a cognitive bias in which unskilled individuals assess their ability (in the context of a given skill) much higher than it really is and highly skilled individuals tend to underestimate their (relative) competence. The problem is not that real experts tend to be modest about their expertise. The real problem is that “if you’re incompetent, you can’t know you’re incompetent. The skills you need to produce a right answer are exactly the skills you need to recognize what a right answer is.”

So in short: Being unskilled in a certain area probably means you don’t really know that you are unskilled.

Or, translated to our young bus driver: If you don’t know anything about driving a bus, you certainly think you are as much a decent bus driver as the man behind the wheel. It looks easy enough from the passenger seat.

The effect in practice

Why should this bother us in software development? Our education system ensures that we are exposed to enough development practice so that we can counter the “unaware of it” part of the Dunning-Kruger effect. But it isn’t effective enough, at least that’s what I see from time to time.

Every once in a while, I have the opportunity to evaluate an existing code base. Most of the time, it produces a working, profitable application, so it cannot be said to be a failure. Sometimes however, the code base itself is so convoluted, bloated and riddled with poor implementation choices that it absolutely cannot be developed any further without a high risk of regression bugs and/or absurd amounts of developer time for little changes.

These hopeless source codes have one thing in common: they are developed by one person and one person alone. This person has developed for months or even years, showing progress and reporting no problems and suddenly resigned, often shortly before a major milestone in the project like going live with the first version or announcing the next version. The code base now lies abandonded and needs to be adopted. And while no code base is perfect (or should even try to be), this one reeks of desperation and frustration. Often, the application itself is not very demanding, but the source code makes it appear to be.

A good example of this kind of project is my scrap metal tale (in three parts) from five years ago:

A more recent case is littered with inline comments that celebrate small victories of the developer:

  • 5 lines of convoluted, contradicatory statements
  • 3 lines commented out
  • 1 comment line stating “YES! This is finally working! Super!”
  • Still three obvious bugs, resource leaks or security flaws in these few lines alone

The most outrageous (and notorious) case might be the Brillant Paula Bean from the Daily WTF, but this code base is at least readily comprehensible.

The origins of the effect

I think a lot of the frustration, desperation, anxiety and outright fear that I can sense through the comments and code structure was really felt by the original author. It must have been incredibly hard to stay on course, work hard and come up with solutions in the face of imminent deadlines, ever-changing requirements and the lingering fear that you’re just not up to the task. Except that we’ve just learned that developers in the “unskilled and unaware of it” state won’t feel the fear. That’s the origin of all the bad code: The absolute conviction that “it’s not me, it’s the problem, the domain, the language, the compiler, the weather and everything else”. Programming is just hard. Nobody else could do this better. It’ll work in the end. Those “minor problems” (like never actually speaking to the hardware, hard-coded paths and addresses, etc.) will be fixed at the last moment. There’s nothing wrong with an occassional exception stack trace in the logfile and if it bothers you, I can always make the catch-block empty.

The most obvious problem is that these developers think that this is how everybody else develops software, too. That we all don’t bother with concurrency correctness, resource lifecycle management, data structures, graphical user interface design, fault tolerance or even just basic logging. That all programming is hard and frustrating. That finding out where to insert a sleep statement to quench that pesky exception is the pinnacle of developer ingenuity. That things like automated tests, code metrics, continuous integration or even version control are eccentric fads that will pass by and be forgotten soon, so no need to deal with it. That we all just fake it and dread the moment our software is used in the wild.

A possible remedy

The “unskilled and unaware of it” developer isn’t dumb or hopeless, he’s just unskilled. The real tragedy is that he doesn’t have a mentor that can alleviate the biggest problems in the code and show better approaches. The unskilled lonesome developer cannot train himself. A good explanation for this novice “lock-in” can be found in the Dreyfus Model of Skill Acquisition (I recommend you watch the excellent talk on this topic by Dave Thomas): Novices lack the skills for proper self-assessment and cannot learn from their mistakes (as stated by the Dunning-Kruger effect, too). They also cannot recognize them as “their” mistakes or even “mistakes”. They need outside feedback (and guidance) to advance themselves. A mentor’s role is to give exactly that.

Conclusion

If you find yourself in a position of being a “skilled and fairly aware of it” developer, please be aware that you’ve probably been mentored sometimes in the past. Pass it on! Be the mentor for an aspiring junior developer.

If you suspect that you might fall in the “unskilled” category of developers, don’t despair! Being aware of this is the first and most important step. Now you can act strategically to improve your skill. There is a whole book giving you invaluable advice: Apprenticeship Patterns: Guidance for the Aspiring Software Craftsman by Dave Hoover and Adewale Oshineye. Two prominent advices from the book are “Be the Worst (of your team)” and “Find Mentors“. And my most prominent advice? “Don’t stick it out alone“.

Programming is (or should be) fun after all.

A procedure to deal with big amounts of email

The problem

You probably know the problem already: A day with less than 500 emails feels like your internet connection might be lost. The amount of emails you receive can accurately predict the time of day. In my case, I’ll always receive my 300th email each day right before lunch. Imagine that I’ve spent one minute for each message, then I would have done nothing but reading emails yet. And by the time I return from lunch, more emails have found their way into my inbox. My job description is not “email reader”. It actually is one of the lesser prioritized activities of my job. But I keep most answering times low and always know the content of my inbox. You’ll seldom hear “sorry, I haven’t seen your email yet” from me. How I keep the email flood in check is the topic of this blog entry. It’s my personal procedure, so nothing fancy with a big name, but you might recognize some influence from well-known approaches like “Getting Things Done” by David Allen.

The disclaimer

Disclaimer: You might entirely disagree with my approach. That’s totally acceptable. But keep in mind that it works for at least one person for a long time now, even if it doesn’t fit your style. Email processing seems to be a delicate topic, please keep your comments constructive. By the way, I’d love to hear about your approach. I’m always eager to learn and improve.

The analogy

Let me start with a common analogy: Your email inbox is like your mailbox. All letters you receive go through your mailbox. All emails you receive go through your inbox. That’s where this analogy ends and it was never useful to begin with. Your postman won’t show up every five minutes and stuff more commercial mailings, letters, postcards and post-it notes into your mailbox (raising that little flag again that indicates the presence of mail). He also won’t announce himself by ringing your door bell (every five minutes, mind you) and proclaiming the first line of three arbirtrarily chosen letters. Also, I’ve rarely seen mailboxes that contain hundreds if not thousands of letters, some read, some years old, in different states of decay. It’s a common sight for inboxes whose owners gave up on keeping up. I’ve seen high stacks of unanswered correspondence, but never in the mailbox. And this brings me to my new analogy for your email inbox: Your email inbox is like your desk. The stacks of decaying letters and magazines? Always on desks (and around it in extreme cases). The letters you answer directly? You bring them to your desk first. Your desk is usually clear of pending work documents and this should be the case for your inbox, too.

(c) Fotolia Datei: #87397590 | Urheber: thodonal

The rules

My procedure to deal with the continuous flood of e-amils is based on three rules:

  • The inbox is the only queue of emails that needs attention. It is only filled with new emails (which require activity from my side) or emails that require my attention in the foreseeable future. The inbox is therefor only filled with pending work.
  • Email processing is done manually. I look at each email once and hopefully only once. There are no automatic filters that sort emails into different queues before I’ve seen them.
  • For every email, interaction results in an activity or decision on my side. No email gets “left there”.

Let me explain the context of the rules in a bit more detail:

My email account has lots and lots of folders to store all emails until eternity. The folders are organized in a hierarchy, but that doesn’t really matter, because every folder can hold emails. The hierarchy of folders isn’t pre-planned, it emerges from the urge to group emails together. It’s possible that I move specific emails from one folder to another because the hierarchy has changed. I will use automatic filters to process emails I’ve already read. But I will mark every email as read by myself and not move unread emails around automatically. This narrows the place to look for new emails to one place: the inbox. Every other folder is only for archivation, not for processing.

The sweeps

The amount of unread emails in my inbox is the amount of work I need to do to return to the “only pending work” state. Let’s say that I opened my email reader and it shows 50 new messages in the inbox. Now I’ll have to process and archivate these 50 emails to be in the same state as before I had opened it. I usually do three separate processing steps:

  • The first sweep is to filter out any spam messages by immediate tell-tale signs. This is the only automatic filter that I’ll allow: the junk filter. To train it, I mark any remaining junk mail as spam and let the filter deal with it. I’m still not sure if the junk filter really makes it easier for me, because I need to scan through the junk regularly to “rescue” false positives (legitimate mails that were wrongfully sorted out), but the junk filter in combination with my fast spam sweep will lower the message count significally. In our example, we now have 30 mails left.
  • The second sweep picks every email that is for information purpose only. Usually those mails are sent by software tools like issue trackers, wikis, code review tools or others. Machines don’t feel the effort of writing an email, so they’ll write a lot. Most of the time, the message content is only a few lines of text. I grab each of these mails and drag them into their corresponding folder. While I’m dragging, I read (and memorize) the content of the email. The problem with this kind of information is that it’s a lot of very small chunks of data for a lot of different contexts. In order to understand those messages, you have to switch your mental context in a matter of seconds. You can do it, but only if you aren’t interrupted by different mental states. So ignore any email that requires more than a few seconds of focused attention from you. Let them sit into your inbox along with the emails that require an answer. The only activity for mails included in your second sweep is “drag to folder & memorize”. Because machines write often, we now have 10 mails left in our example.
  • The third sweep now attends to each remaining mail independently. Here, the three-minutes rule applies: If it takes less than three minutes to reply to the email right now, then do it right now and archivate the mail in a suitable folder (you might even create a new folder for it). Remember: if you’ve processed an email, it leaves the inbox. If it takes more than three minutes, you need to schedule an attention slot for this particular message on your todo-list. This is the only time the email remains in the inbox, because it’s a signal of pending work. In our example, 7 emails could be answered with short replies, but 3 require deep concentration or some more text for the answer.

After the three sweeps, only emails that indicate pending work remain in the inbox. They only leave the inbox after I’ve dealt with them. I need to schedule a timebox to work on them, but after that, they’ll find themselves out of the inbox and in a folder. As soon as an email is in a folder, I forget about its existence. I need to remember the information that were in it, but not the message itself.

The effects

While dealing with each email manually sounds painfully slow at first, it becomes routine after only a short while. The three sweeps usually take less than five minutes for 50 emails, excluding the three major correspondence tasks that make their way as individual items on my work schedule. Depending on your ratio of spam to information messages to real correspondence, your results may vary.

The big advantage of dealing manually with each email is that I’ve seen each message with my own eyes. Every email that an automatic filter grabs and hides before you can see it should not have been sent in the first place – it’s simulating a pull notification scheme (you decide when to receive it by opening the folder) rather than leveraging the push notification scheme (you need to deal with it right now, not later) that emails are inherently. Things like timelines, activity streams or message boards are pull-oriented presentations of presumably the same information, perhaps that’s what you should replace your automatically hidden emails with.

You’ll have an ever-growing archive with lots of folders for different things (think of a shelf full of document files in real life), but you’ll never look into them as long as you don’t desperately search “that one mail from 3 months ago”. You’ll also have a clean inbox, preferably in “blank slate” condition or at least with only emails that require actions from you. So you’ll have a clear overview of your pending work (the things in your inbox) and the work already done (the things  in your folders).

The epilogue

That’s when you discover that part of your work can be described as “look at each email and move it to a folder” as if you were an official in charge for virtual paper. We virtualized our paperwork, letters, desks, shelves and document files. But the procedures to deal with them is still the same.

Your turn now

How do you process your emails? What are your rules and habits? What are your experiences with folders vs. tags? I would love to hear from you – in a comment, not an email.