Quick and dirty is a skill

Being clean coders we build our software based on quality and reflect on how we do it. We set internal standards in code and UIs, we write tests, we polish.
But there are times when all this focus on quality is obstructive. Times when we need to learn something. For example: at a start of a project when fundamental questions like is it feasible, how should this interaction work, what’s the right order of steps are unanswered, learning needs to be as cheap as possible.
Here quick and dirty is important. The problem is our ego. We want to polish it, we want to build real software with a sound structure. But quality takes time. The problem is quality is not important when answering the fundamental project questions, learning is. May be a mockup in Powerpoint is enough? (not even writing code? ugh). A simple sketch on a piece of paper. Or maybe just a quick demo hacked together in an afternoon.
I know these suggestions may insult our pride. But we need to focus on what’s important: sometimes that’s quality, sometimes that’s speed.
Decades ago when I started coding, quick and dirty wasn’t a problem. Everything I wrote was quick and dirty. I was learning all the time. Over time I got better at developing software, structuring applications and building robust systems. But quick and dirty was lost along the way.
When you write something for the purpose of learning it can happen that you are wrong and all the code has to be thrown away. If it was just 2 hours patching something together that’s okay, but what if you spent a whole week? Just like writing quality software, quick and dirty is a skill in itself and as with other skills we need to practice it.
But beware this is not only a problem at the start of a project: often as developers we tend to overthink something, we plan for every possible outcome, imagine scenarios with weirdly acting users or systems. This is the time to stop and implement something to learn. To get feedback. Not to overanalyse or overdesign. Just release something and test it with real users, it doesn’t need to be part of the software in production, just use a demo or a staging environment. But if you need to learn something, focus on that, not on quality.

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